OTC Medicines Corner

Back to articles

Glucose Testing Devices Have New Features But Require Careful Use

KEY POINT

New to the U.S. market are glucose testing and monitoring devices that can use forearm rather than fingertip blood samples. However, because of physiologic differences between hairy and hairless skin, patients must be careful to use the forearm samples only when blood glucose values are not likely to be changing rapidly.

SOURCES

Bennett RW, Koh-Knox CP. Diabetes mellitus. In: Berardi RR et al., eds. Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care. 13 ed. Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association; 2002:954–9.

Rosenthal WM, Briggs GC. Home testing and monitoring devices. In: Berardi RR et al., eds. Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self- Care. 13 ed. Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association; 2002:1030–3.

Jungheim K, Koschinsky T. Glucose monitoring at the arm: risky delays of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia detection. Diabetes Care. 2002;25:956–60.

Ellison JM et al. Rapid changes in postprandial blood glucose produce concentration differences at finger, forearm, and thigh sampling sites. Diabetes Care. 2002;25:961–4.